Can standards be practical?

standards_goals     In most countries, such as Australia/NewZealand standards are practical and don’t set impossible goals. In the case of products, they are based on sound industrial, scientific and consumer experience and are regularly reviewed to ensure they keep pace with new technologies. Standards can cover everything from consumer products and services, construction, engineering, business, information technology, human services to energy and water utilities, the environment and much more. However, it seems when standards are applied to educational arenas the chaos begins because the standards are often designed in an impractical way and set impossible goals. Without SRL standards are chaotic and can discourage both the teacher and learner. SRL encourages proximal goal setting, one that can be attained in a specific amount of time. When the goal is being set paths to goal attainment are explored to be sure the goal is realistic and that goal achievement will increase self-efficacy.

goal too high  The chaos suggested around the recently launched common core standards in the USA can be alleviated if teachers apply a SRL approach and use the standards as guidelines to set proximal goals aligned with each students individual learning needs. This can be easily done by becoming managers of standards based classroom instruction who implement how they are reached using SRL. Instructors who see the standards as guidelines to educate all students fairly have been able to use the standards to set classroom goals and learning objectives to reach those goals. In addition, these teachers employ self-regulated learning strategies to encourage students to take charge of setting individual goals, monitor their performance for attempt to attain their goals, and STOP and REDO the goal if they have set the goal too high. The standard remains the same, how to get there is what makes all the difference!

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